On the bench, a nice Titus watch with a stainless steel case. This would be called a boys watch nowadays with a diameter of 30 mm without the (original signed) crown.

For some reason, this Swiss brand is one of the most redialed brands out there. So, watch out if you’re looking for one on eBay, for example. This is an article on how to avoid a redial.

The dial looks to be two-tone with the markers in a separate circle.

The movement is a Felsa 465, hand winder with 17 jewels. It didn’t run at all when I received it.

Because of the fixed stud holder and the characteristic red tip on the second hand, I’d date this watch to the early 1950s.

Disassembly

Remove any power from the mainspring.  Hold the crown between your thumb and index finger and let it slip while you move the click away from the ratchet wheel.

Remove the balance and the pallets. Now might be a good time to pre-clean the pallet stones and the pallets crown. You can do so with a sharpened peg wood.

Titus

The balance and the pallets disassembled

Remove the hour wheel (you can actually lift it immediately after you removed the hands and dial) and the cannon pinion on the bottom plate of the movement. You can’t remove the center wheel with the cannon pinion in place.

The bearing jewel for the 3rd wheel was completely clogged with old lubrication and lots of it. Too many lubrication that has thickened over the years will cause friction and cause the amplitude to drop.

Titus

The bearing jewel almost overflowing with gooey lubrication

The mainspring will have lost some of the kinetic energy already because of age. Too many issues like this clogged bearing jewel will cause the kinetic energy to drop so low that it stops the watch.

Lift the wheel-train bridge and remove the escape wheel, 3rd wheel, and the sweep second wheel.

Titus

The wheel-train bridge, escape wheel, 3rd wheel, and sweep second wheel removed

Remove the ratchet wheel and the crown wheel and lift the barrel bridge.

There was a lot of grease underneath the crown wheel and the ratchet wheel. Caked grease around and in the barrel arbor creates friction and causes the amplitude to drop.

Titus

You can see the grease that was under the ratchet wheel and the crown wheel

Remove the center wheel cock, the center wheel, and the main barrel.

Titus

The top plate completely empty. Notice the caked grease around the barrel

Turn the movement around and start with the bottom plate.

Titus

The motion works and the keyless works. As you can see, the set lever spring is broken

Remove the motion works and the keyless works. Disassemble the capstones to be able to clean them and this side of the bearing jewels.

Titus

The bottom plate completely empty

Pre-clean all the caked grease and the bearing jewels with a peg wood. Then, clean all the parts in the watch cleaning machine.

Assembly

Start with the main barrel, the center wheel, and the center wheel cock.

Titus

The main barrel, center wheel, and center wheel cock installed

Fit the escape wheel, 3rd wheel, and the sweep second wheel and replace the wheel-train bridge.

Titus

The wheel train and the wheel-train bridge reassembled. You can actually see the pinion of the 3rd wheel now

Fit the barrel bridge, crown wheel, and the ratchet wheel.

Titus

The barrel bridge, crown wheel, and the ratchet wheel refitted

Turn the movement around and start with the motion works and the keyless works.

Titus

The bottom plate completely reassembled. Fitted a new set lever spring

Flip the movement to the top plate and fit the pallets and the balance.

Titus

The Felsa 465 completely serviced and running fine

Fit the dial and the hands and re-case them. Regulate the rate as close to 0 as possible while staying on the + side.

Titus

Titus dress watch ready for a few more decades

What do you think of this Titus? Do you own a Titus as well? Let me know in the comments below.

Founder & editor of WahaWatches. I’ve been collecting watches for years. My favourite part is to pull them to bits.

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