Tag: Omega

Restoration: Omega 2416 with cal. 28SC

This Omega 2416 came in a batch of watches to look at. It didn’t run, it was dirty and the crystal was in a terrible shape.

The movement is an Omega 28SC. It has an indirect sweep second. The concept wasn’t that successful as it had a few problems. The second hand would often stutter as it’s not in the direct flow of power from the gear train. Also, it adds an extra layer to the movement, resulting in a thicker movement. This movement still lasted for 6 years, though. After the movement was relisted as the 370 they probably used it for another few years.

It’s possible to look up the serial number on the charts available on the internet. The charts tell you that this particular serial number is from 1943. However, several sources state that the 28SC is in production since 1944. It must be one of the very first ones then.

For more info, here is an article about how to date your watch and this is an article on how to authenticate an Omega.

Continue reading

Founder & editor of WahaWatches. I’ve been collecting watches for years. My favorite part is to pull them to bits.

I send out an email newsletter with the newest articles and the best tips about vintage watches, restorations and collecting.

Restoration: Omega De Ville

I got this Omega De Ville watch in a batch to look at. It didn’t run and it was impossible to wind it or set the time. The diameter of the watch is 33 mm without the crown. The movement is the 620 cal with 20848991 as the serial number which dates it to 1963. The Vintage Omega Database has this model recorded as 111.0077 as part of the 1962 international collection. If you’d like to know how to authenticate and date your Omega watch, click here.

Disassembly

This Omega De Ville is a front loader. That means that the movement with the dial and hands need to be lifted from the front. In order to do that, I first have to remove the case back.

Continue reading

Founder & editor of WahaWatches. I’ve been collecting watches for years. My favorite part is to pull them to bits.

I send out an email newsletter with the newest articles and the best tips about vintage watches, restorations and collecting.

How To Spot A Fake Omega In 5 Steps

You’ve found an interesting vintage Omega watch. Perhaps on Ebay or another auction site or even at a yard sale. How to check the authenticity of an Omega watch? Or in other words: how to spot a fake Omega?

This is an article about vintage Omega watches in general and the steps to take to authenticate them. If you’re interested in specific models I recommend DetectaFake. They have an excellent article about Speedmasters and Seamaster dive-watches.

How to Spot a Fake Omega with these 5 Steps

  1. Dial and hands
  2. Reference number/case number
  3. Caliber
  4. Serial number
  5. Crown

I’ve added some final tips at the conclusion.

Continue reading

Founder & editor of WahaWatches. I’ve been collecting watches for years. My favorite part is to pull them to bits.

I send out an email newsletter with the newest articles and the best tips about vintage watches, restorations and collecting.

© 2017 WahaWatches

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑