Category: Restoration (page 1 of 4)

Restoration: Omega 2416 with cal. 28SC

This Omega 2416 came in a batch of watches to look at. It didn’t run, it was dirty and the crystal was in a terrible shape.

The movement is an Omega 28SC. It has an indirect sweep second. The concept wasn’t that successful as it had a few problems. The second hand would often stutter as it’s not in the direct flow of power from the gear train. Also, it adds an extra layer to the movement, resulting in a thicker movement. This movement still lasted for 6 years, though. After the movement was relisted as the 370 they probably used it for another few years.

It’s possible to look up the serial number on the charts available on the internet. The charts tell you that this particular serial number is from 1943. However, several sources state that the 28SC is in production since 1944. It must be one of the very first ones then.

For more info, here is an article about how to date your watch and this is an article on how to authenticate an Omega.

Continue reading

Founder & editor of WahaWatches. I’ve been collecting watches for years. My favorite part is to pull them to bits.

I send out an email newsletter with the newest articles and the best tips about vintage watches, restorations and collecting.

Restoration: Longines Dress Watch

This Longines dress watch came in for me to take a look at. It has a Longines 280 movement.

The serial number dates this watch to 1961. Click here for more information about how to date a watch.

Longines dress watch

The crystal is very scratched. The crown is worn and crooked and the stem is bent. Two of the lugs are bent as well

The watch did run but it didn’t keep time and it kept stopping. The lugs (2 of them) were bent. The winding stem was bent and the crown and the crystal were in a bad shape.

Continue reading

Founder & editor of WahaWatches. I’ve been collecting watches for years. My favorite part is to pull them to bits.

I send out an email newsletter with the newest articles and the best tips about vintage watches, restorations and collecting.

Restoration: Helicon Digital Jump Hour

This is the first time that I had a Helicon on the bench. It’s a Helicon Digital jump hour with a Förster 201 movement under the hood. These funky jump hour watches are typical of the 1970s.

Helicon Digital jump hour

Helicon Digital jump hour watch as it arrived

The case is in a bad condition. The base metal is visible underneath the chrome as you can see. The only solution would be to get it re-chromed. The crystal was scratched and needed to be polished.

The watch was running slow and it had an amplitude of <200 so it needed a service.

Continue reading

Founder & editor of WahaWatches. I’ve been collecting watches for years. My favorite part is to pull them to bits.

I send out an email newsletter with the newest articles and the best tips about vintage watches, restorations and collecting.

Restoration: Moeris Watch

This time a nice Moeris watch. Moeris is a respectable Swiss brand from around the turn of the 19th century. Tissot bought and absorbed them around 1970. The movement is an in-house Moeris 10 1/2 D. A hand winding movement with 17 jewels. This particular one has an Incabloc anti-shock system. I’d date this watch to be from the 50s.

The watch didn’t run at all. Most of the times that’s a bad omen. It shows that there likely is some serious damage somewhere in the gear train or the escapement. The most common causes are tangled hairsprings and broken balance staffs. Anyway… on with disassembling.

Continue reading

Founder & editor of WahaWatches. I’ve been collecting watches for years. My favorite part is to pull them to bits.

I send out an email newsletter with the newest articles and the best tips about vintage watches, restorations and collecting.

Restoration: Pierce Vitaflex

This time a Pierce Vitaflex on the bench. A service wasn’t immediately necessary but the amplitude was a bit on the low side and the movement appeared to be dirty. A service never hurts so I decided to go ahead with it. The most obvious thing is, of course, the fact that the hands had no lume left at all. They needed to be filled anew.

Pierce Vitaflex

I’ve seen some Pierce watches with ETA movements but this one has an in-house movement, the Pierce 105. It’s a hand winder with 17 jewels and this particular one has an Incabloc shock protection. I’d date this Pierce Vitaflex to be from the late 1950s.

Continue reading

Founder & editor of WahaWatches. I’ve been collecting watches for years. My favorite part is to pull them to bits.

I send out an email newsletter with the newest articles and the best tips about vintage watches, restorations and collecting.

Older posts

© 2017 WahaWatches

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑